The Ultimate book about the Pacific Crest Trail

A year or so ago, I was invited to submit images to Rizzoli Press, an east coast book company that planned to publish a coffee table book on the Pacific Crest Trail.  Eight pictures were selected. The book is  marvelous.  Written by Mark Larabee and Barney Scout Mann, it captures and preserves the spirit, the challenge, the essence of the trail for those who love and admire the PCT, and wilderness in general.  The images are awesome, and I am humbled to be included.  Here are a few of mine.

 

Thousand Island Lake, John Muir Trail
Thousand Island Lake, John Muir Trail
Forester Pass, Pacific Crest Trail
Forester Pass, Pacific Crest Trail
Crater Lake, Pacific Crest Trail
Crater Lake, Pacific Crest Trail
Mt Jefferson Wilderness, Pacific Crest Trail
Mt Jefferson Wilderness, Pacific Crest Trail
Elk Lake Oregon, South Sister
Elk Lake Oregon, South Sister
William O Douglas Wilderness, Pacific Crest Trail
William O Douglas Wilderness, Pacific Crest Trail
Norse Peak Wilderness Basin Lake
Norse Peak Wilderness Basin Lake Washington
Norse Peak Wilderness, Pacific Crest Trail
Norse Peak Wilderness, Pacific Crest Trail Washington

Recently, I was astounded to see a couple of these pictures included in an article that Nicholas Kristof posted on the NY Times blog about this book. Most significantly, the first picture above, Thousand Island Lake, is featured in the blog.

Meg and I spent our honeymoon in 1967 at Mammoth Lakes, on the east side of the Sierra Nevada mountains.  I suggested a day hike, going  from Reds Meadows to Thousand Island Lake I had not checked the mileage, and only after we arrived back at the car in the dark, did I realize it was twenty miles round trip. Fortunately, Meg did not ask to annul our marriage 🙂

 Forty years later, I hiked the John Muir Trail with a friend. We set up our tents at Thousand Island Lake just before a mild afternoon thunderstorm blew through. When it cleared, I was astounded  by the gorgeous  early evening light . It was huge “welcome back.”

Here is the link:  Nicholas Kristof’s Facebook post: https://www.facebook.com/kristof/posts/10154451444192891

And check out the book itself on Amazon.  It is a wonderful way to travel the trail vicariously!

“Our short lives on earth are sowing time.”

“Our short lives on earth are sowing time. If there were no resurrection of the dead, everything we live on earth would come to nothing. How can we believe in a God who loves us unconditionally if all the joys and pains of our lives are in vain, vanishing in the earth with our mortal flesh and bones? Because God loves us unconditionally, from eternity to eternity, God cannot allow our bodies – the same as that in which Jesus, his Son and our savior, appeared to us – to be lost in final destruction.

“No, life on earth is the time when the seeds of the risen body are planted. Paul says: “What is sown is perishable, but what is raised is imperishable; what is sown is contemptible but what is raised is glorious; what is sown is weak, but what is raised is powerful; what is sown is a natural body, and what is raised is a spiritual body” (1 Corinthians 15:42-44). This wonderful knowledge that nothing we live in our bodies is lived in vain holds a call for us to live every moment as a seed of eternity.

“The wonderful knowledge, that nothing we live in our body is lived in vain, holds a call for us to live every moment as a seed of eternity.”  Henri Nouwen

 

Rime frost tamarack

Lord, make me a instrument of your peace

“Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy.

“O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love; For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying that we are born again to eternal life.”  St Francis

Multnomah Falls fallsMultnomah Falls

A late season transition

Fall comes to a close in NE Oregon, from the Grande Ronde Valley to Wallowa Lake. Saturday was overcast, the type of day where normally I would not have gone out with my camera.  But we had friends visiting from Hong Kong and we wanted to show them Wallowa Lake. As it turned out, the sky was filled with dramatically defined dark clouds and special subtle shades of light shone through.

 

attitude adjustment, Joseph Oregon

“Attitude Adjustment, Joseph Oregon

Egglegson Corner, Wallowa County

Eggleson Corners, Wallowa County, Joseph Oregon

Minam Canyon, Wallowa County

Minam Canyon, Wallowa County

Mt Emily barn, Grande Ronde Valley

Mt Emily, Grande Ronde Valley, Union County

Wallowa LakeWallowa Lake

A Prayer of long ago that speaks to us today

Despite what the politicians tell us, their rule/glory is not our final destination.  We are all part of God’s love, and we are called to reach out to ALL people with that love.

 

“According to the greatness of your goodness and your many mercies, look down on me and hear the prayer of your poor servant, exiled far off in the land of the shadow of death.  Protect and keep the soul of your servant, traveling amidst the many dangers of life.  By your grace, direct him along the path of peace until he is back home in the land of everlasting brightness.Amen”  The Imitation of Christ, Thomas a Kempis

You  show me the way of life,
  granting me the joy of your presence
and the pleasures of living with you forever.
                                           Psalm 16:11
New England fall
Acadia

Maine colors

Every time Meg and I go to New Hampshire to visit our son and his wife, I wonder if I will see anything “new and different” to photograph. Always, however, I find changing  light and shadow, unique perspectives and angles, new locations.  This October we spent time in Maine.  Here are some of the pictures.

maine-tree-reflection-vista-wm

 

Acadia, Jordan Pond Acadia

Jordan Pond, Acadia National Park

Maine fall

 

 

Maine fall

 

colors and rocks

 

Maine

 

Maine

 

 

 

Maine

 

Maine

 

Maine, Petite Moran Wildlife Refuge

 

 

Maine

Waiting patiently

“Help me Lord to be more conscious of your presence. Teach me to recognize your presence in others. Fill my heart with gratitude for times your love has been shown to me through the care of others.”

I do need to renew my confidence in God’s Presence on a continual basis.  I have full confidence that He showed his Love, Mercy, Compassion and Justice through His Son, Jesus Christ.  Yet, like all of us, I wish I did not have to wait to see this mercy and justice distinctly happen in all  troubled parts of the world, in all  troubled heart.. Ultimately, all I can do is share my love and compassion with others—and recognize the faith of Psalmist, the faith I must maintain, “wait upon the Lord.” And while doing so, serve others.

 

fall New England
New England fall
Yet I am confident I will see the Lord’s goodness
    while I am here in the land of the living.
 Wait patiently for the Lord.
    Be brave and courageous.
    Yes, wait patiently for the Lord.
Psalm 27

Hiking Mt Osceola, New Hampshire White Mountains

Trails in the White Mountains reflect the toughness of their New England forebears–granite rocks, web like roots, straight up, unswerving direction. The switch backs of the West, with their overall smoothness, are a delightful luxury after the trail challenges here.  Meg and I enjoyed a hike up Mt Osceola led by son, Michael, last Saturday. It took a while to adjust to difficulties, but by the end, we were ready to come back another time.

 

White Mts
White Mts
White Mountains
Mt OsceolaWhite Mountains

White Mountains

White Mts
White Mts

Mt Osceola

Acadia National Park

Meg and I enjoyed Acadia National Park at the height of fall colors. Shaped  by fire, heat, water, and ice, the land is an exquisite tapestry of geologic features formed over five hundred million years ago. A vacation land  for the well to do in the early twentieth century, Acadia was recognized as a place for all to enjoy. The National Park was established in 1919. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. planned and donated an extensive carriage road system, which is still actively used today for hikers, bikers, and even carriage riders.

Another tradition that still exists from Acadia’s earliest years are popovers and strawberry jam at the restaurant on Jordan Pond, Jordan Pond itself is a pristine water source that provides water to the park, and offers a wonderful trail around it.

 

 

Acadia. Bay boulder color distance fall color

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Jordan Pond popovers, Acadia

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Jordan Pond, Acadia
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Jordan Pond, Acadia
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Jordan Pond, Acadia

schoodic-point-wm

Schoodic Point, Acadia

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Photos by Eric Valentine