Tag Archives: Snake_river_canyon

He will wipe away all tears

He will swallow up death forever!
  The Sovereign Lord will wipe away all tears. 
                                                Isaiah 25:8
 
As I read this passage a couple days ago, once again I was awed by the knowledge of God’s love.  Despite the unhappy struggles we all go through during our lifetime, God prevails.  He does give us life after death; He does know  our sufferings, and WILL wipe away our tears.
 
A couple of weeks ago, as Meg and I were camped above the Snake River in Hells Canyon, a hummingbird whizzed back and forth in the early evening light. I clicked quickly, hoping I might come close to capturing the moment on camera.  This hummer is obviously not in focus, but its glow is mystical.  God’s presence is mystical; it is quiet; it is “be still land know I am God.”  And, it is His gift to us that He will “wipe every tear from our eyes!”
Saddle Creek Campground Wallowa County
Saddle Creek Campground Wallowa County

McGraw Creek cabin Hells Canyon, Part 3, Tuesday

One of my goals of hiking and camping in this Hells Canyon area was to visit the McGraw Creek cabin. This name and location has resonated in my mind for many years.  I had only seen it on a map, and had read nothing about it.  Still, its utter loneliness and inaccessibility had drawn my interest.  How did one live such an isolated life and survive?  Certainly, were I a writer, I would enjoy writing a tale about the motivations and strengths and challenges of those who survived here.

So on Tuesday, a two mile hike took us there.  The cabin had fallen down, but the creek sang and the wildflowers, once again, were gorgeous.
Meg enjoying the tranquility of our campsite in Hells Canyon

looking into the McGraw creek drainage

Meg on the trail to McGraw Creek

How did they get this farm implement here, miles above the Snake river?

The McGraw Creek cabin, Hells Canyon

remarkable that this saw is still here

Obviously, I loved photographing these Indian paintbrush

The llamas were content to stay “home”